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This spirited look at our national birthday explores the stories behind the familiar symbols of the Fourth of July and tells how they have come to be associated with the holiday. It will make the Fourth of July more meaningful
for readers young and old. James Cross Giblin is an editor of children’s books who also writes for children. He edited the Clarion holiday series started by the late Edna Barth. Ursula Arndt brings to this book the same delightful style she employed as illustrator of the six Barth holiday books. This title, along with all of Edna Barth’s classic holiday books, is now being reissued with a fresh, new jacket design and fun activities inside the paperback covers.
July 4th is so special is because it’s Independence Day, a holiday celebrating the anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. In 1776, founding father and soon-to-be president, Thomas Jefferson wrote what is now the United States’ most famous and cherished document to give a list of grievances against King George III of England. It was written to justify the colonies breaking away from the mother country and becoming an independent nation. Revised by Benjamin Franklin and John Adams, the Declaration of Independence was signed by our founding fathers and accepted by Congress on July 4,1776.
But the spirit of Independence Day is not only about the United States officially becoming a country. It’s about celebrating the values that the country was founded upon. The Declaration of Independence was written
with the theory that every person has inherent rights, called “self-evident truths” in the official document. It reads: “We hold these truths to be self-evident: That all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”
A readable holiday offering that flows smoothly along in a stream of anecdotes and interesting facts. Giblin launches his short historical synopsis with “”What led up to the Declaration of Independence?” and ends it with an emphasis on the “”meaning”” of the declaration, that government must be by consent. 

Until tomorrow: A man’s character may be learned from the adjectives which he habitually uses in conversation. 

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Dorothy Prats
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