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Assistive technology is any device that helps a person with a disability complete an everyday task. If you break your leg, a remote control for the TV can be assistive technology. If someone has poor eyesight, a pair of glasses or a magnifier is assistive technology.
Assistive technology includes many specialized devices as well, like typing telephones for people who are deaf and motorized wheelchairs for people who cannot walk. Assistive technology can be “low-tech” (something very simple and low-cost, like a pencil grip), or “high-tech” (something sophisticated, like a computer). Assistive technology can be critical for the person using it – if you wear glasses, think how hard it would be to get through the day without them!
IDEA states that school districts must consider assistive technology for any child in special education. That means that for any child receiving special education services, the educational team must ask if there is a device that will “increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities” of that child. If the answer is yes, the school district must provide certain services: a qualified evaluator must complete an assistive technology evaluation; if the evaluator recommends a device, it must be acquired; and if you, your child or the staff in your child’s school need training to use the device, that training must be provided, too.
Deciding which teaching strategy is right for your child is not always easy. Here are some guidelines you can follow to help you choose which teaching strategies are right for your child: Beware of simple solutions. Because children learn in a number of different ways, there is no single method for helping all children with learning disabilities. Good teaching is intentional, systematic, and takes time.
Ask questions.
It is important to know whether the strategy you are considering has been effective with other children.

By: Dorothy Prats